For collabs/conversations/commissions contact:

www.slutmouth.co.uk 

slutmouthdesign@gmail.com

 

  • Instagram
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Instagram

Slut Mouth is a creator of erotic, glittery and raunchy products from Hartlepool.

 

Rejecting the taboos we hold against our bodies, sexuality and sex.

Tell us about your queer journey so far... 

 

At the age of 14 I realised that I found both males and females attractive, but it was also a feeling I pushed down and denied for myself. At 19, I told friends I was bisexual, the reaction was not what I expected, I wasn’t really sure what I expected, but I was hoping for positivity. I was called greedy, attention seeking and told that I should make my mind up as I’m just confused and can’t have both. At the age of 19 I had my first relationship with a woman, and this was when I noticed the stigma was not only in the ‘cis’ community as experienced as a child and adult, but it was buried within the LGBTQIA community too. At this age, I understood that I am a ‘free spirit’ and can fall in love with a person rather than a gender. Even on this path of self-discovery I still faced the same or similar comments that were made to me as a teenager and I know that these issues aren’t unique to me.

What does queer art mean to you and who is your art for? 

 

A lot of my art is based around me trying and coming round to accepting myself, my body and my sexuality, and in truth I’m only just at the very beginning of acceptance.

Art is an extremely important thing, it communicates to very diverse audiences in an exciting, sensitive, raw unapologetic way. It creates feeling, connection understanding and stories. As for queer artists using different mediums to their values, struggles, ideas and creativity across is also very important. The queer community is constantly challenged by oppressiveness from communities and higher ups that should be protecting and valuing us. It was only during lockdown I discovered that LGBT conversion therapy still exists legally in the UK. It is important for queer artists to keep creating conversations. Hopefully these conversations will lead to change and progression and bridge the gaps between communities and laws.


 

Have you found yourself immersing in queer art culture in this time of crisis and isolation? 

 

Both, during the start of lockdown I was extremely proactive, when I began burning the candle my mental health dwindled a bit. I began to slow down almost to stopping point, I found it very hard to stay in the middle, it has been a wild ride on the wave. It seems now everything is in the fast lane as it was at before lockdown which is quite sad, I began to appreciate the stillness and plodding about, I think the world moves far too fast and its very important to take it slow, at least every now and again. A queer artist I discovered during lockdown who is fabulous is ‘The Girth of Venus’ - what a wonderful name!! I am trying to be methodical about where my time is spent and how I approach my business and the art community in a very different manner now, trying to think long term about how to handle a very person centred business mainly online if anything like this happens again or if this pandemic doesn’t shift quite as quick as we planned can be quite daunting, I am very lucky to have got funding from ‘BloomInArt’ who have also enrolled me into a program aimed to help people become more digital.

Sassiest anecdotes or stories. 

 

I am wracking my brain for sassy stories and I cannot think of anything, I’m quite blunt and straight the point maybe I’m sassier than I realise? Nothing springs to mind. I will tell you that I have always wished I could click, and I’m convinced I will never be able to, trust me I have tried and had multiple people try and teach me but never successful. I bet that if I could click it would emphasize my ‘secret’ sassiness? Please get in touch if this is something you also struggle with I’m convinced it is an actual thing!!

Who inspires you?

 

I am inspired by lots of wonderful people in my local art scene. Before the pandemic it was really booming and it has been great to see how since the lockdown they have had to tackle things differently, for example ‘Picasso Baby’ a local collective who before lockdown where running events in ‘Disgraceland’ where artists who have free roam of all surfaces to create and design onto, then after the week of creating there would be a huge party at the end, during lockdown they published an online magazine which I am also featured in, Bobby Benjamin one of the creators of Picasso Baby runs Pineapple Black gallery in Middlesbrough and John Perangie his Picasso partner is a fine artist who does drag in his spare time for the Bordello Collective. These are just two examples of the fabulous creatives in the North East!